4 Safety Aspects to Using Ceiling Hoists for Patient Handling

The operation theatre is a congested place given what goes on there (life-saving). It is where the medical professionals need to be at their absolute best in order to save the life of their patients. They need all the help they can get, technological or otherwise. That’s where ceiling hoists come into play. They can help handle and transfer patients while keeping their safety and health in check.

What safety aspects should you be considering when you’re getting a ceiling hoist for your patients?

They Help Prevent Pressure Sores in Patients

There was a review back in 2009 that outlined how effective ceiling hoists were in reducing the risk of contracting musculoskeletal injuries in patients. Due to the time constraints inside an operation theatre, it often falls upon nurses and other staff to transfer the patient to the operating table and they have to do it quickly.

While it is their job to make sure that nothing happens to the health of the patients, it sometimes becomes unavoidable due to the stress and fatigue that the nurses have to endure. Patients often complain of pressure sores or sometimes even something worse like musculoskeletal pain when they are done with the operation and come back for a check-up.

When a ceiling hoist is used, it helps to reduce the stress on the patient when being transferred to the operation theatre and table. This results in diminishing post operation patient complaints regarding sores and ulcers that result from increased pressure when transferring them.

Eases the Pressure on Nurses and Other Staff

Nurses and nurses’ aides are also among the people who complain of back pain and other injuries. It’s not just the patients. And it’s about time that this pain isn’t just disregarded as part of the job. A way to help reduce this pain that comes with patient handling is to use ceiling hoists.

The ceiling hoists are much more appropriate to use because it reduces the amount of manual lifting that is done by the nurses and aides. The back pain and injuries that result from patient transfer and lifting causes absenteeism in the nursing staff. Most of the complaints that the staff bring in are related to back strain and back pain.

No Need to Worry About Infections

Some people may argue that there is significant risk if the ceiling hoist is above the patient at the time of surgery. This is not the case, as a full room covering system such as that from PatientHandling.com.au is used, there will be no railings or hoists above the patient during the surgery.

The ceiling hoist can be parked away from the sterile area as instructed by caregivers so that there is no threat of infection and post-operative complications.

Improving Practices for Greater Safety of Patients

The way to go about transferring and handling patients may have been different before and needs to be based on historical evidence in part. But that shouldn’t be the only determining factor. With the evidence and research supporting the use of ceiling hoists, it should be clear why it is beneficial to use them.

 

Image courtesy of Suriya Kankliang at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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