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5 Reasons Orgasms Are Good for Your Health

There can be a lot of power in pleasure; so much so that there are still more people than you’d realize trying to put a limit on the freedom that comes when you come. Even though having an orgasm is both mentally and physically good for your health, society as a whole still hasn’t gotten around to praising their many benefits quite as often as they should. In fact, it’s taken centuries to debunk twisted fictions that correlated masturbating with illness, and others that suggest there is just one correct way to experience orgasm. The good news is that today’s scientists are becoming increasingly more sex-positive, with several new studies offering a range of interesting facts on the health benefits of orgasming. Here are five that you may not have been aware of.

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#1. Ease Stress and Anxiety:

Giving yourself an orgasm can be one of the best ways to get rid of anxious thoughts spiraling out of control. Research carried out at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands found that during orgasm, activity in the hippocampus and amygdala, the parts of the brain responsible for alertness and anxiety, falls to significantly lower levels in women during arousal and climax when compared to a resting state.

#2. Get Better Sleep:

If you’re struggling to sleep at night, then a Big-O could be exactly what you need. Falling asleep after having sex may be a cliché, but it does happen for a reason. The oxytocin released when you climax decreases the production of stress hormones which keep you awake, in addition to higher levels of endorphins, which help make your eyelids feel heavy and tired after sex.

#3. Live Longer:

Yes, really – having more orgasms can actually make you live longer, according to Dr. Howard S. Friendman’s Longevity Study, which was conducted over twenty years on a total of 672 women and 856 men. Over this time, women who reported experiencing more pleasure and orgasms in their lives tended to live longer than their less sexually satisfied peers. So, investing in a vibrator sex toy could actually help to prolong your life!

#4. Improve Your Partner Bond:

Having more orgasms as a result of sex with your partner can help to strengthen the bond between the two of you, which can lead to a whole host of health benefits in itself. Post-orgasm, the bonding hormone oxytocin flows through our systems, helping us to feel closer to our partners. As a result, post-sex conversations that happen as a result of oxytocin can strengthen the bond between a couple, helping to improve trust, intimacy, and communication.

#5. Improve Your Looks:

Last but not least, having more orgasms can actually lead to improved looks, particularly when it comes to your complexion. Orgasms not only decrease stress and anxiety hormones, they also help to minimize inflammation in the body. As a result, your skin will look less puffy when you’re experiencing pleasure on a regular basis.

Whether you’re having fun with a partner or giving yourself some love, there’s more to orgasms than simply feeling good!

Posted by - June 2, 2018 at 12:36 am

Categories: Health Information   Tags:

3 Bedtime Rituals To Help You Sleep Better

If you constantly have trouble falling and staying asleep, you’re more likely to experience chronic fatigue, a slower metabolism and reduced physical and cognitive functioning. How do you improve sleep quality and achieve a more restful, restorative sleep?

The National Sleep Foundation suggests sleeping on a mattress that lets you sleep easily and comfortably with the right support your body needs. Practicing a relaxing bedtime ritual can also help you transition from the day’s action-packed events to a more calm part of the night.

A routine activity right before bedtime also helps you leave the stress of the day behind, making it easier for you to not only fall asleep but also achieve deep, quality sleep for a longer period. Here are some of the bedtime rituals you can do to ensure a good night’s sleep.

Dim the lights

San Francisco psychologist Steve Orma suggests turning down the lights before bed to trigger the production of melatonin, a natural hormone that is associated with the onset of sleep.

Melatonin is made by the pineal gland in the brain. At daytime this gland is inactive, but once the sun goes down and the body is exposed to darkness, the gland starts to produce melatonin and secrete it into the bloodstream. As a result, the body’s level of alertness decreases and you begin to feel sleepy.

For best results, turn the lights off completely. In a study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, it was reported that exposure to room light, even dimmed, between sundown and bedtime suppresses melatonin during the usual sleep hours.

Aside from turning off the lights, you should power down your electronic screens as well, or at least use a blue light filter. Blue spectrum light from devices such as smartphones and tablets can trigger the brain to stop the production and secretion of melatonin, leaving you awake.

Cool off

For optimal sleep, the National Sleep Foundation recommends keeping bedroom temperature between 60 and 67 degrees Fahrenheit. The temperature of the body decreases as you prepare to sleep, and to facilitate this drop in temperature and make it easier for you to fall asleep, you need to keep your room or yourself cool.

Make it a habit to set your thermostat to the ideal temperature and make sure that it stays consistent. If you don’t have a heating or cooling system, take a bath or a shower. A cold one right before bed is ideal. If you want a hot shower, do so around a couple of hours before bed so that your body has enough time to cool off.

Make your bed

The bedroom environment can affect your ability to sleep well at night, so tidy up. In a survey conducted by the National Sleep Foundation, results suggest that people sleep a whole lot better when their bedrooms were clean and comfortable.

The foundation stated that the survey participants reported not only getting longer hours of sleep but also feeling better about heading off to bed when their bedroom was comfortable, with a made bed and fresh sheets.

These three simple bedtime rituals can help you doze off easier and allow you to have a longer, more comfortable night’s rest. What other nighttime rituals can you suggest for better sleep? Let us know!

 

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Posted by - April 8, 2018 at 12:16 pm

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Pneumococcal Vaccine for Adults

There are two types of vaccines available for prevention of pneumococcal pneumonia. The first is pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine, used for vaccination of adults and the second pneumococcal vaccine is protein conjugated pneumococcal vaccine, used for immunizing children.

Pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine is in use since 1980s and is made from capsular polysaccharides of 23 serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae which are most prevalent in any community. The vaccine found to be effective in several studies, although the effect decreases with age of the immunized individual and also time from vaccination (the effectiveness of vaccine decreases slowly 5 years after administering the vaccine).

Who should get vaccinated with pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine?

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends the following individuals to be vaccinated with pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine:

  • All individuals aged more then 2 years (two) who are at risk of pneumococcal infection or at risk of developing complication.
  • Individuals who underwent spleen removal or have anatomical abnormality in spleen.
  • Persons of more then 65 years of age.
  • Immunocompromised persons such as multiple myeloma, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease, HIV infection, undergone any organ transplantation, individuals who use glucocorticoid regularly etc.
  • Individuals with diabetes, chronic lung disease, cardiovascular disease, CSF leakage, cirrhosis, chronic alcoholics, persons with chronic renal insufficiency etc.
  • Health care professionals.
  • Native Americans and Native Alaskans in USA, as they are at increased risk of developing pneumococcal pneumonia due to genetic predisposition.

Unfortunately the pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine may not work in the individuals, who need it most, AIDS patients and patients of lymphoma, due to poor IgG responses.

What is the recommendation schedule of vaccine?

The pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine is recommended in the above mentioned individuals every five years, as the antibody levels decline with time. Although some recommends getting only single booster vaccine after five years.

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Posted by - May 21, 2010 at 3:11 pm

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