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What sitting is doing to our health and how to fight it

Many people spend up to 50% of their time awake in a seated position, and this is really bad news because studies say that sitting for longer than 3 hours a day can shave life expectancy by as many as 2 years. Even if sedentary lifestyle doesn’t cut your lifespan, it can still punch a few dents in your medical record and increase risk of chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes type 2, low bone density, and heart disease. The sheer amount of damage all that sitting is doing to our body is enough to send shivers down the spine – and here’s a short list of health problems linked to sedentary lifestyle, and a few easy ways to fight them.

Image sitting

Sitting stiff is full of aches

They don’t say that sitting is the new smoking without a reason: strained back muscles are only the tip of the sedentary iceberg hazards. Here’s what sitting for hours does to your body.

Spine, back, and neck strain

Sitting puts more pressure on your spine, neck, and back than standing or walking, especially if you have a habit of slouching at your desk. According to certain studies, 40% of people suffering from chronic back pain spend most of their day sitting. Sitting causes spinal disks to lose their natural flexibility, which ups the risk of herniated disks and long-term spine damage.

Reduced muscle strength

Your body is designed for movement, and without regular stretching, walking, and engaging in physical activity, your leg, glute, and abdominal muscles will lose strength and elasticity and start to deteriorate. Sitting for hours on end also affects exchange of nutrients in muscle cells, and malnourished muscle tissue can hamper your mobility even further.

Lower bone density

Staying seated for hours is a shortcut to reduced bone mineral density and joint pains, which can contribute to early onset of age-related bone loss, arthritis, osteoporosis, and osteoporotic fractures. The risk goes up even more if sedentary lifestyle is coupled with improper diet, high intake of sugar, salt, and refined vegetable oils, and failure to follow a well-timed meal agenda.

Higher risk of heart disease

Sitting slows down blood flow, and sluggish circulation is a byword for metabolic rate drops and easier cholesterol buildup in blood vessels. A 2015 research showed that blood flow slowdown caused by excess sitting can result in elevated blood pressure and increased risk of heart disease and stroke.

Increased risk of cancer

Sitting in a slouched position for hours compresses stomach and abdomen contents, which can cause sluggish digestion, camps, bloating, heartburn, constipation, and dysbiosis. But gut glitches don’t stop there: as the pace of transformative processes in the body drops, insulin production goes up, impacting cell growth and upping the risk of cancer development by over 30%.

Image risk of cancer

 

Avoid sitting all-day long

The fact that all-day sitting is a part of your job description doesn’t mean you need to renounce all hope of good health over a solid paycheck. There are many ways for you to keep your bones, muscles, and blood vessels strong even with 8+ hours of sitting a day in the mix.

Activate your seating

Dynamic sitting is an easy fix for most health concerns caused by sedentary lifestyle as it prompts the body to move even when seated. To ‘activate’ your sitting sessions, swap your sofa for a rocking chair and replace the office conference chair by its ergonomic counterpart.

Take up yoga or sports

After work hours are over, don’t just plop down in front of the TV and call it a day. Increasing active time by taking up yoga or sports can reduce risk of chronic diseases, prevent muscle and joint pains, and boost the metabolic rate, allowing the body to burn more calories even when inactive.

Built to sit and be fit

If you’re locked to the PC at the office, make sure that your chair and workstation are custom-arranged to minimize the negative effects of sitting. You can replace the chair by a stability ball to keep your muscles engaged, your core active, and your posture in place.

Rethink the desktop

Another simple trick to reduce risk of sitting-related health problems, the desktop should be organized in view of promoting a healthy posture. Height-adjustable sit-to-stand workstations are also a good idea as they encourage movement essential to seamless long-term health.

Loosen it up or lose it

If you can’t cut your seated sessions any shorter, you can at least loosen up after all-day sitting’s done. Neck manipulation, massage, and professional chiropractic services boost blood flow to the brain, alleviate chronic back and neck pain, and enhance natural spinal alignment and healthy posture.

Posted by Sophia Smith - July 22, 2016 at 12:19 pm

Categories: Guest Posts   Tags: , , , , , ,

Should You Use Phentermine?

ID-10073371Phentermine is an appetite suppressant drug that is approved (including USFDA) for use in obesity. Since 1959, the year of FDA approval of Phentermine, it is being used for various medical conditions, including weight reduction in obese people. Phentermine is an amphetamine class drug with many similarities to amphetamine. Phentermine should not be used for more than 2-3 month as it does not have weight loss effect after 2-3 months of use, as Phentermine develops tolerance to the appetite suppressant effect and if continued for more than 3 months it may cause rebound weight gain, which will frustrate the obese person taking Phentermine.

If dietary restriction, regular physical exercise lifestyle modification etc. (which are general measures of weight loss program) are not followed strictly, Phentermine may not give the desired results and fail to reduce weight in obese individuals. All these general measures are also required for maintaining body weight after losing it, as Phentermine is not useful in maintaining normal body weight after bringing it down to normal.

Obese people:

Phentermine can be used by obese people to reduce body weight. Obesity is the term used when BMI (body mass index) of a person is more than 30, which is below 25 in normal individuals. If a person’s BMI is 25 to 30 it is termed overweight. Phentermine should be used by obese individuals (and preferably by individuals with BMI more than 35 when some other medication or method of weight reduction like diet and regular physical exercise has failed) only and not by overweight persons. Phentermine should not be used as first line treatment of obesity, it should be used for short term of 2-3 months only and when other methods are not working or suitable for a particular obese person. All these precautions are taken before starting Phentermine, because of addiction liability and certain potentially serious side effects and also Phentermine is not useful in long run. Phentermine can help in reducing weight in obese individuals, if combined with exercise, diet and behavior modification, but it can not sustain normal body weight in long term and for this reason Phentermine used for short term only. Read more…

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Posted by - September 12, 2013 at 11:56 am

Categories: Health Information, Nutrition   Tags: ,