Five of the Hottest Products from Around the World

Any discussion of the top five foods is going to be hotly debated. When you talk spice, well hot food fanatics will always claim their favorite dish makes everyone else collapse in pain.

As it turns out, there are only a few substances that occur naturally in food that give off a sensation of heat, the grand-daddy of course being Caspaicin, the power behind hot peppers.

In most cases, these chemicals cause a reaction by acting on a receptor in the mouth called TRPV1, short for transient receptor potential vanilloid 1. That’s a mouthful in itself. The heat-bearing compounds in spicy food, like capsaicin, stimulate the TRPV1 receptors and send those waves of burn crashing through your nervous system.

One of the reason that spicy foods have such devout fans is that the reactions that happen after the TRPV1 receptors wake up, is that the body responds as if you’re pain because, well you are in pain. A natural pain-relief response is a release of endorphins. These proteins produce a number of effects, but chiefly, they relieve pain and give an overall feeling of well-being. For those acclimated to spicy food, it’s a feel-good post-meal added value.

So what foods will light up your TRPV1s and bring on that endorphin high. Here are five of them.

  1. Blair’s 16 Million Reserve – this is a 1 milliliter pharmaceutical vial that contains pure capsaicin crystals. It tops the Scoville scale, a measure of capsaicin-based hotness, at 16 million Scoville units, essentially 3,200 times hotter than a jalapano pepper. Chances are you will never get your hands on any, as only 999 of the vials were made. However, Blair’s Sauces and snacks has many high-octane capsaicin-based sauces and products containing extremely high Scoville ratings.
  2. CaJohns Get Bitten Black Mamba 6 Hot Sauce – drop about 10 million points on the Scoville scale and you get this hot sauce made from Chocolate habaneros and fortified with capsaicin extract. It’s only 1,200 times hotter that the reference jalapeno. To give you another frame of reference, pepper spray, used by law enforcement and for personal safety, is between 2 and 5 million Scoville units.
  3. Trinidad Scorpion chile – getting out of the man-made monsters of hot, it clocks 1,463,700 Scoville units and was recognized by the Guinness Book of Records. Rumor has it that a sister strain is going to dethrone this natural wonder, but for the moment, it is the spiciest plant recognized.
  4. Peppercorns – another substance that excites the TRPV1 receptors is Piperine. It’s the potency found in black pepper, which is not related to chile peppers at all. Unlike capsaicin, piperine is slightly water-soluble, so in theory, a big glass of water might quench the peppercorn fire, while it only spreads the hot pepper flame. This is the chemical that gives fire ants their burn, too.
  5. Wasabi, horseradish and mustard – each of these foods is powered by allyl isothiocyanate and like peppercorns each has a bit of water solubility that capsaicin lacks. There’s no way to compare piperine and allyl isothiocyanate hotness using the Scoville scale, since it is a measure of capsaicin concentration.

Patrick,
Browse-read.com

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